Lake Oswego CD

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The Lake Oswego CD was the first Dead drop item collected relating to OTP22. This disc was found at the Lake Oswego Public Library drop inside the book First Ladies.

Disc information

The CD was created with CDBURNERXP version 4.4.1.3243. The disc image is 642,527,232 bytes.

Standard Deviation of the image:

Contents

The disc contains the following files:

filename lines words bytes comments
otp.txt 2376276 11881376 71288256 five columns* of 5-letter "words" (aka 5grams). Every permuation exists in the file.
p1.txt 11881376 23762752 142576512 two columns of 5-letter words, each containing every permuation; the first column in alphabetic order.
p2.txt 11881376 23762752 142576512 same, second column is shuffled.
p3.txt 11881376 23762752 142576512 same, second column is shuffled.
p4.txt 11881376 23762752 142576512 same, second column is shuffled.
49901780 106932384 641594304

Px.txt sequential letters

On January 20th, 2014 it was found that when you compare the first 5gram in the right column of each file (the first "random" / otp encoding) - the last letter was sequential. This could point to the first 5gram being chosen at will, or pointing to the generation method being incremental.

filename first righthand entry last letter
p1.txt TADLL L
p2.txt ABSYM M
p3.txt ZCYDN N
p4.txt ALHTO O
p1.txt (New York*) QCUPP P

*The New York p1.txt file was not included in the Lake Oswego CD, but illustrates this pattern continuing later.

This pattern does not seem to apply to the second row, etc.

The Bursage device outputs text files very similar to the P#.txt files and presents a similar pattern with the same letter position. (see here for more information)

OTP.txt discrepancies

OTP.txt contains primarily lines representing 5 columns of 5-letter words. The file contains every 5-letter sequence possible.

Since there are only 11881376 words possible - which is not divisible by 5 - a discrepancy in the file eventually has to occur. Why this discrepancy does not appear directly at the end is a mystery.

Lines 2376259-2376277 (end of file):

BLKYM IQLXY NBQJZ YKZYE ZGAZQ
UXAXQ MSCJP FBAAC QWAUP
KZDWN TPFJP JIEGZ HFVYQ MYIJH
LKMFS LYEHY TLOCT DJIPU KQGTV
UZQWO IVHKG XJKYC EACIC LLRZV
SSZJK KMOYG MYITG WTZXC ZNZCE
ITKOX RGPMQ ELPXY BHMDM ZINCT
MWUNQ YCEGO XRNBB KLHGV ZAIYR
AAFPQ ESSPV VXIXQ CBFAR ZHCPE
JUOLP KALWP JCJBK RLUHX AUYUF
WAUBI PNYHY USTMV XQMHO QQALE
GSVDZ NXMVD ASXXQ MCPOG SYRVE
LRXSC PEAMU IOKGK IPIHA GPALI
GIJQM SCEYT QXVAJ EPNJN TLYJB
UVPQZ ILKBW LZBXD RWUPE IBTPZ
JKCAP MQMPU VZWWQ CTPFD HUSYG
TECQY JDJXC PALQU BHHCE VVJBK
LWGPH FEENV

It is unknown at this time whether this fluke has any importance or is simply an artifact of the generation program.

Generation

The method of generating these files remains unknown, however it is most likely that either the files are generated from shuffling the list of all permuations, or is (less intensively) generated from formula with an increasing index.

The existence of multiple different files seems to imply a different seed value, formula, or variable used when generating the files.

Use as order codes

Files from the Bursage_Loop_drop device are similar to the OTP.txt file. The lines of these files have been used as Message Desk product order codes during Keep Alive sessions.

Use as encoding keys

The P1-P4.txt files can and have been used as replacement keys for 5gram messages. This is often seen in the List of NATO messages we received. In this scheme, a message is encoded by splitting it into sections of 5 letters, finding the matching sequence in the first column, and outputting the value in the second column. To decode the message, the reverse is done.

So far, all of our messages except for one have used Right-To-Left decoding (encoded Left-to-Right).

Similar files

Different P#.txt files have been recovered from both Central Park drop 2 and Pennsylvania Tree Trunk drop.

Files similar to OTP.txt have been generated by the device found at the Bursage Loop drop.

Relevant IRC posts

Abridged marcusw explanation of CD contents, #otp22, Sat Sep 15 17:50:00 UTC 2012

12:51 < marcusw> anyway, line/word/byte counts for the files are as follows:
12:51 < marcusw>   2376276  11881376  71288256 otp.txt
12:51 < marcusw>  11881376  23762752 142576512 p1.txt
12:51 < marcusw>  11881376  23762752 142576512 p2.txt
12:51 < marcusw>  11881376  23762752 142576512 p3.txt
12:51 < marcusw>  11881376  23762752 142576512 p4.txt
12:51 < marcusw>  49901780 106932384 641594304 total
12:51 < marcusw> so we see that p[1-4] are very similar to each other
12:52 < marcusw> looking at these files, we also see that the are 26^5 lines long
12:52 < marcusw> and also that they go like this:
12:52 < marcusw> AAAAA TADLL
12:52 < marcusw> AAAAB EVQVQ
12:52 < marcusw> AAAAC APKRK
12:53 < marcusw> all the way through
12:53 < marcusw> ZZZZX ZFZXT
12:53 < marcusw> ZZZZY KHDSO
12:53 < marcusw> ZZZZZ QMCTH
12:53 < marcusw> the first column is in order, every permutation from AAAAA to ZZZZZ
12:53 < marcusw> and the second column appears random at first glance
12:54 < marcusw> anyway, the second column is NOT random
12:54 < marcusw> it contains exactly the same thing as the first column
12:55 < marcusw> it's just shuffled around a lot
12:55 < marcusw> so each 5gram appears exactly twice in the file, once in each column
12:55 < marcusw> which means there's a one-to-one mapping both ways
12:55 < marcusw> which means you can encrypt and decrypt both ways
12:57 < marcusw> anyway, p[1-4] are identical except for the order of column 2
12:57 < marcusw> they are 4 versions of the same key
12:59 < marcusw> so we move on to otp.txt
12:59 < marcusw> otp.txt is a very, very interesting file
12:59 < marcusw> as camelCase (IIRC) observed, it has the exact same number of every letter
13:00 < marcusw> 2284880 of each, if my calculations are correct
13:00 < marcusw> this means that this file is again NOT random
13:00 < marcusw> even though it looks like it to begin with
13:00 < marcusw> see:
13:00 < marcusw> OICOV ZDNOU EKKYO GVKMD CSIRC
13:00 < marcusw> HXDGF DTKAS WTDAT QMBKK PKMVL
13:00 < marcusw> QGJIR HAVHB JXPMQ PZYIN HOJTK
13:00 < marcusw> FJVDE DWINR SOPLM GDGEG RPIGL
13:00 < marcusw> so we see, 5 words of 5 letters each line
13:01 < marcusw> 25 letters per line, 30 bytes per line
13:01 < marcusw> otp.txt...OTP=one time pad, which tells us how to use the file
13:02 < marcusw>   2376276  11881376  71288256 otp.txt
13:02 < marcusw> that's lines, words, bytes, if you're just joining us
13:02 < marcusw> 1 character = 1 byte
13:02 < marcusw> that includes newlines and spaces
13:02 < marcusw> so we see that 2376276 lines * 5 words/line = 11881380 words total
13:03 < marcusw> right?
13:03 < marcusw> WRONG
13:03 < marcusw> we only have 11881376 words
13:03 < marcusw> otp.txt is missing four words
13:03 < marcusw> before we figure out WHY, we're looking at WHERE
13:04 < marcusw> thankfully, they're very easy to find
13:06 < marcusw> the words missing from otp.txt are:
13:06 < marcusw> 2376260 UXAXQ MSCJP FBAAC QWAUP
13:06 < marcusw> 2376276 LWGPH FEENV
13:06 < marcusw> one missing from a line near the end, three missing from the last line
13:06 < marcusw> why are they missing from these lines specifically?
13:06 < marcusw> fuck if I know
13:07 < marcusw> an unpredictability of some sort in their script
13:07 < marcusw> it would appear the file was generated in chunks
13:07 < marcusw> but I'm going to talk about HOW the file was generated before that
13:07 < marcusw> remember how it has only 11881376 words instead of 11881380?
13:07 < marcusw> 11881376 is a special number, 26^5
13:08 < marcusw> and every letter appears the same number of times
13:08 < marcusw> so the solution is that otp.txt is simply all words AAAAA-ZZZZZ in random order
13:08 < marcusw> they just took a column of a p file
13:08 < marcusw> and scrambled it
13:09 < marcusw> and divided it into 5 columns
13:09 < marcusw> now the funny thing about 11881376 is that it's only divisible by 2 and 13
13:09 < marcusw> no other factors, especially not 5
13:10 < marcusw> and now we see why the words are missing
13:10 < marcusw> they wanted to have 11881376 words and 5 per line, but that's not possible
13:11 < marcusw> so as for exactly why the words are missing from those lines, I don't know
13:12 < marcusw> it looks like they were grabbed from a bucket or something, and when the bucket got empty, shit got weird
13:12 < marcusw> this concludes the report on otp.txt
13:13 < marcusw> ok, gonna talk about the CD
13:14 < marcusw> it probably has date+time stamps...IDK
13:14 < marcusw> I just looked at it with hexdump
13:14 < anonen_> marcusw: can you see what type of computer made it or any info at all
13:14 < marcusw> anonen_: yes, actually
13:15 <@asdgfsadg> marcusw, dump infoz
13:15 < marcusw> CDBURNERXP 4.4.1.3243
13:15 < marcusw> CD001
13:15 < marcusw> DISC

See also

Lake Oswego Public Library

External links

CIPHER EXPLANATION

Same text on pastebin

LINK TO CD ISO