303 309 0004/Investigation/Horns

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Archived from here: 303_309_0004/Investigation#Horns.2FITA2

Investigation This is an investigation subpage.

The information found here includes bleeding-edge updates, information dumps, and speculation.
The factual/summarized article for this page is: 303 309 0004/Investigation
Be sure to separate different subjects here using a new section and subtopics using ===Subsections===.

NEW 5th horn sound with siren noise

date=October 17, 2012 time=13:35 New 5th horn sound was discovered on 303-309-0004. Recording - CAUTION TURN VOLUME DOWN!!!

SSTV comparison

The new horn follows the same pattern as the others: nfx-o-gram (original spectrogram). The numbers are: 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 3 2 1 1 2 3 2 2 4 2 1 2 3 4 1 4 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 3 2 .

The number sequence can be decoded in python:

   numbers = [2, 1, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 3, 2, 1, 1, 2, 3, 2, 2, 4, 2, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 4, 1, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 1, 3, 2]
   startbit = 1 # Can also be 0
   result = ""
   for i in range(len(numbers)):
       result += str((i + startbit) % 2) * numbers[i]
   
   print result

The result is: 11011010 10001101 00111001 10000110 11000111 10111101 10101011 011100. But notices that there is nothing to indicate that this is a correct interpretation.


Added by LHeinrich (17.Oct.2012)

I did a little bit of playing around with the numeric data from this horn (hereafter "Horn A") and from the one on the 13th (hereafter "Horn B"). On page 1 of my notes, I graphed Horn A, Horn A over Horn B, Horn A XOR Horn B, and Horn A with a sawtooth over it. Page 1

From that, on page 2, I played with the idea that there was PWM encoded data in the pulses in wub portion of the recording. Page 2

I tried using a 50% duty cycle with a wavelength of 2n (n being the length of one pulse). From there, I graphed the value from 0 to 1. If I overlaid 2 pulses over the duty cycle, and I got 11, I graphed a 1. If I got 01 or 10, I graphed 0.5. Finally, if I got 00, I graphed 0. I would have continued the graphing of the wave, but I ran out of paper for drawing the pulses (also time). I will update this when I can.

I find it interesting that the resulting wave is fairly regular. Once the whole wave is graphed, we should see what we can do with it. Perhaps it is some form of a carrier wave, or with the proper decoding, it may yield some sort of useful data.

Another NEW HORN SOUND Sun 14th 09:00 UTC

Recording

First few seconds can be SSTV image SSTV Full Zoomed SSTV decoded strip

New sound Sat 13th

a new sound appears! LINK a spectrogram of this sound can be found HERE

The new horn follows the same pattern as the old one: nfx-o-gram. The numbers are: 2 1 1 2 7 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 2 3 3 6 3 1 1 4 2 4 3 3 3 2.

LINK TO RECORDING

LINK Caution headphone users! Turn volume down!


SPECTOGRAMS & stuff

What follows is user-submitted imagery of the sound.

[1]

[2] => the long audio seems to contain three types of sounds

[3]

[4]

[5]

[6]

[7]

[8]

[9]

[10]

[11]

[12]

[13]

[14]

[15]

[16]

http://pastebin.com/NavxqyvK

[17]

[18]

[19]

[20] This image is the shorter wav subtracted from the longer wav (invert then mix/render in audacity) - what remains is the differences between the two wav files. Where there is nothing it means the wav files were the same for that portion). If these pulses are Morse code then it says VAMTREI

[21]: short horn (below, time warped) fits perfectly with parts 4 and 5 from the long horn (above)

Building on the above idea, Long horn take short horn compared to the part that it fits with: [22] Either the pulse boundaries line up exactly or they are half a pulse out. This may lead to some more data with further manipulation.

Speculation

http://pastebin.com/NavxqyvK

Some quotes:

<crash_demons> oo maybe that's what it is.... Ring (sped up) Silence (messed up) Dialtone (messed up) Rapid beeps (messed up) where the rapid beeps are where you leave the phone off the hook too long? :p

<crash_demons> they sound quite a bit distorted though if thats them

<crash_demons> if you look closely, the audio has 4 parts: ring/beep, low buzz, dial tone, rapid beeps. and the erratic distortion happens throughout *all* of it.

<crash_demons> the beeps have that random rough areas, so does the dialtone part, and the buzz, etc.


<Ymgve> there's more than three types of things - first there's the noise part that lasts for 8000 samples, then there's 24000 samples of something that alternates every 4000s, then there's 25 seconds where it alternates between two different waveforms, an 8000sample buffer of some kind, then 30 seconds of alternating stuff like previously but cleaner, then 24000 pulses of what might be more alternating stuff, then a 10 second part that appears to be repeat

<Ymgve> here's some of the pulse widths in part 2 and 3 in your split: http://pastebin.com/NavxqyvK

<Stoca> I count 20 50 75 60 50 20 70 20 25 110 50 20 100 80 75 120 50 20 50 60 for the number of cycles per alternating waveform that's from the middle 29 seconds

Binary work by user Oshosh

I've been continuing on this line of thinking, and here's what I came up with:

The audio can be divided into seven distinct parts, as shown here. Each part has one or two alternating tones. Each tone, it seems, plays for a multiple of a set amount of time. For example, this picture shows the spectogram of Part 5 with the length of each tone (the tiny black lines at the bottom) and for how many multiples it plays (the dots).

If, in each part, we take the first tone to be 1 and the other to be 0, repeated a number of times equal to a multiple of what seems to be the lowest common denominator of the lengths of each tone, we can convert the parts into binary. For example, in the same picture showing Part 5, the sequence of dots -- 1 below, 2 above, 1 below, 3 above, etc. -- translates into binary -- 1 one, 2 zeros, 1 one, 3 zeros, etc. The result for each section is as follows.

  • Part 1 - 1
  • Part 2 - 1010101
  • Part 3 - 1100010110011101100011100101101000000100010100
  • Part 4 - 1
  • Part 5 - 1001000111001000101111110010000111100011111100100111 (the inverse, 0110 1110 0011 0111 0100 0000 1101 1110 0001 1100 0000 1101 1000, is thought to be more likely)
  • Part 6 - 1111111011111111111111111000000111100
  • Part 7 - 1

-- oshosh (talk) 07:10, 3 October 2012 (UTC)

One can see from this picture that the short horn also has 4 parts that fit with parts 1,2,3,4 of the long horn, and that subtracting them yields clearly oshosh's part 3 binary. Part 4 seems like some kind of "intermission" or "separator".

Relation to 3233

Speculation has been made as to whether the binary bit string from part 5 corresponds in some way to the hex string from the 3233 code, given that both have 52 digits. This relation is explored here.

LeastWeasel's work

I tried a different kind of Fourier transform, and got what I think is a clearer picture.

This picture shows the transformation overall.

This one shows the second discrete 'section'. I came up with 0101010001110100110000100111000011010010111111011101011 as the binary representation.

For the next discrete section (known as section 5 above), I used the smallest solid band as a point of reference and came up with a few different possibilities, based on this template: 1001000111001000010111111001000001111000(0)11111(1)00100111, where "( )" wraps around bits I'm not entirely sure about. This means we have a few different combinations to try out, such as:

  • 10010001110010000101111110010000011110001111100100111
  • 100100011100100001011111100100000111100001111100100111
  • 100100011100100001011111100100000111100011111100100111
  • 1001000111001000010111111001000001111000011111100100111

Stoca Zola's work

Part 1

  • Step 1. Import the long horn and short horn in audacity and line them up exactly.
  • Step 2. Invert the short horn
  • Step 3. Mix/render the tracks
  • Step 4. The differences form pulses[23]

Part 2.

  • Step 1. mojorisin comments that the second part is the same length as the first part
  • Step 2. Using the boundaries between signal types as indicated by the header/footer tones, line the middle and beginning of the long horn
  • Step 3. Invert and mix as before
  • Step 4. *INCORRECT WAVE FORM USED OOPS *

Part 3.

Doing the same as part one on the new horn noise [24]


Speculation

On IRC we had the idea of listening to the tones sped up to 600%, this lets you actually hear these pulses plus the pulses in the second part of long horn become more audible. If it's morse code it doesn't seem to mean anything though.


blyind's notes

Tried taking the above into and breaking it into blocks of 5(seen below) ASIFP TACVC OUEYN UEYOC LELAU FPDLY ALUPO UEPOC LCTPO UEHIK BFKBZ UEOUE POUEH KPHOO FGTUE OXOYF

tried running this through p1-p4.txt's and heres the results.

   -----------------------ORIGINAL-----------------------------
   ASIFP TACVC OUEYN UEYOC LELAU FPDLY ALUPO UEPOC LCTPO UEHIK
   BFKBZ UEOUE POUEH KPHOO FGTUE OXOYF
    
   --------------------------P1--------------------------------
   WDMVQ FJIGI LOEPR QPDZK ZKZUR IDFUA GCNBZ ROCPT WUKQJ AJMXG
   GMJOO RRKDC PARDB FKGET RWXRC ZQGAG
    
   --------------------------P2--------------------------------
   AJXPB RHSCH KPEQX BSVMK UGCNN ZKBRJ FDWXA CZZCY KOIWC NBCNU
   DKQER YINIV QUADL YKPUW MLPDK EGFDH
    
   --------------------------P3--------------------------------
   YBHRP BXJSM EDHJH WEHXQ VGQXV UKJVI EDPMP UNPGL MAVIO BURTW
   RMWYG SIFYN IKNWB ODZHV YAIZF TUXWI
    
   --------------------------P4--------------------------------
   BNIBI PWJCO LBDQK ZPYBV LPBVO ZJQMI MDPKG YLQRU DCCGD EGKQP
   QYVLO QVGNH VRXZV MDPMU RSKZJ HPJYJ
    
   -----------------------P1RES-P2-----------------------------
   TBZQE ZMJBW JZKAF IYTMX HJWOL QCJKT KIFMH GWXJT FIXAE DJZKH
   WXRJN ZZENY UUPJO KEFTL MELWS TDHPX
    
   -----------------------P1RES-P2-RIGHTSIDE-------------------
   KLMZD QZVDF OQEBP AWAKE QHUHQ SDIKC YHOPR SHYOI IETTJ MHZNQ  
   XQLJK GJJYV HIZGL NVGVS BJWGS CRHMC
                                                                
   -----------------------P1-P2RES-P3-------------------------
   AVPXI WBRHL TGIEQ KMLFD VWNBI EZXTI KRCFQ AOALF XPRKH PPAUR
   RPUEJ IIQDG ZTOAQ IUGTM ZIXST YQOEH
    
   -----------------------P1-P2RES-P3-RIGHTSIDE----------------
   FYSDC NFXIN CHQVB QGEYV BLWSG WPMKN HPVGV VEWNE BSPBI URRVZ
   MWVKE WVTJG NHHFA YMSDV SETGV YNYIN
    
   -----------------------P1-P2-P3RES-P4-----------------------
   DLSGH VVGCS QBXCA YERFU NUFZQ RBMEH DSQHL CRYQR KVGWD OCVFX
   NYYSI HLBNB ZNMVT JZBPM CYROW CUUFH
    
   -----------------------P1-P2-P3RES-P4-RIGHTSIDE-------------
   EGRKS VYPHZ EJTCX AMKTV DIVNO TPKHZ FRNBO HEJDY ETCVG RZETX
   WMBWJ AKHOB FURPQ JDQQS HDBNL AEWQK
   -----------------------P1RES-P2-RIGHTSIDE-P2----------------
   WDMVQ CEIYF LOEPR QPDZK IKAAB IDFUA GCNBZ ROCPT WUKQJ AJMXG
   GMJOO RRKDC PARDB FKGET RWXRC ZQGAG
   -----------------------P1RES-P2-RIGHTSIDE-P2RIGHTSIDE-------
   JPBZS KUTPX TQTVN HULQZ NMRFJ VGHCY PFSKG NCTWH MMORV JRGLJ
   VNRKL UEMHR YZICT EFJCY OOHUD OGIRZ

as you can see nothing made sense. oh well =(

FEW LINKS ABOUT SUBMARINES COMMUNICATION

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fzg-YgrvTcM&feature=related
http://en.wikipedia.org/?title=Underwater_telephone
http://articles.janes.com/articles/Janes-Underwater-Warfare-Systems/AN-WQC-2A-United-States.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/?title=Communication_with_submarines
http://www.funtrivia.com/askft/Question45311.html
http://www.dosits.org/people/communications/communicateunderwater/